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Posts for tag: Oral and General Health

Beginning with Trick Or Treat, Halloween parties, and never really ending, Autumn is a season where sweet treats seem to be ever-present. Hopefully most health minded individuals will compensate by increasing their brushing and flossing accordingly. :)

One type of treat that may surprise you with its ability to ravage the teeth as well as the rest of the body is not what you eat, but your beverage choice of soda and juices. Children are particularly vulnerable! Childhood and adolescence are times of accelerated growth with increasing caloric needs. The attraction and availability of sweet beverages can lead to not only an increase in tooth decay, but also tooth erosion where areas of the tooth begin to soften and discolor, as well as childhood obesity. Childhood obesity can lead to other health problems such as hypertension and elevated levels of serum cholesterol. Obesity and Type II diabetes have been linked to soda consumption.

Another consideration is that MILK has been greatly displaced by soda and non-citric juices in the average child and adolescent's diet in the U.S. Not only do these empty calories cause dental problems and potentially lead to weight problems, but the lack of calcium-rich milk sets up the growing body for a lifetime of future bone density problems. The phosphoric acid in many sodas limit calcium absorption, and therefore can have a negative influence on bone density for both children and adults, both now AND in the future.

There is really very little to be gained by drinking more than the occasional soda, or buying it for our children. Softening, or dissolving of tooth enamel begins at acidity levels at the pH of 5.5, and many soft drinks are much more acidic than this at the pH of 2.2. NOW, THAT'S REALLY SCARY!!!